A Case for Managing Talent: Build Relationship Frameworks

 

Thank you, Ben Casnocha! Thank you, Millennials!

Is it implausible that I am studying the wisdom of an individual who was born in 1988? Given the similarities between my generation and the Millennial generation, it works. You see, Millennials want to change the world too.  As a Baby Boomer and somewhat of an “earth momma” I knew I was changing the world but then, out of necessity to survive, I conformed.  Like many of my Boomer peers, as I grew older, I recognized that success and happiness were synonymous for me. I came to understand that my success would be achieved if I returned to the authenticity I fought for in the earlier decades of life. One of the things I admire most about Millennials is they share the belief . . . no . . .  the requirement of authenticity.

Millennials waver far less in their values than many in my generation.  They are steadfast in their need to give back to the community, the family, and more.  They are not settling.

I’m referring to Ben Casnocha. To my point, take a moment to review Casnocha’s blog, casnocha.com, or the book he co-authored with Chris Yeh, and Reid Hoffman, The Alliance: Managing Talent in the Networked Age.

The lack of an authentic relationship between employer and employee undermines the loyalty employers desire. Millennials are not just loyal because they should be. Their commitment is  linked to their need to be a part of something that matters and mirror both values and purpose. They want to know that their professional development is taken seriously, including addressing their need to be mentored and coached.  It is not uncommon that a Millennial will similarly require they be allowed to mentor and coach others. For them, 360-degree sustainability is a mandate. That includes their career, family, community . . . and so much more.  Give them all of that, and the Millennial, who many employers believe, will never be loyal, will be by your side for a long time.

The loyalty of a Millennial must be earned. In a recent presentation at Professional Convention Management educational event, Casnocha shared,

We need to use a relationship framework where both sides can make promises to each otehr that they can actually keep.

Ben Casnocha

Professional Convention Management Association, June 2016