Change in Today’s NEW Marketplace: Evolution or Revolution?

Ask Ray Kroc, founder of the fast food chain, McDonalds, about success.

If you love what you’re doing and you always put the customer first . . . success will be yours.

Ray Kroc

At last count, McDonalds had almost 37,000 locations worldwide so there must be something to this “customer first” thing. Since Kroc’s organization began in 1955, the marketplace has changed. During those six + decades, business has evolved. While many changes influenced the evolution, many have joined Kroc on the list of change leaders. Technology and globalization are among the many factors that fed the evolution. And, each of the leaders that led that evolution share this legacy. They were . . .

Aware of opportunities

Applied sound business practice

Faced challenges

Effected change

Some believe these leaders were just lucky; they were in the right place at the right time.  In truth, historical research indicates these individuals were aware of changes impacting business and dreamed evolution was possible. They dreamed it, hoped it, planned it, and gave it a deadline. Each, in their way, effected evolution.  At the time, some onlookers thought of the changes as revolution. I’m sure for many, the loss of “the way we used to be”, felt like revolution then and to some, what we’re discussing here may also be akin to revolution.

The fluidity of today’s marketplace combined with demographic evolution of the world’s citizenry, have brought us to an intersection of hope, opportunity, challenge, and change. hope opportunity challenge change custom_four_street_sign_13089

No culture, country or business is exempt from addressing a fundamental shift in business promulgated by the fact that people have and are changing.  It is one thing to refer to the generations and quite another to consider that each generation shares a span of birth years and collective experiences. As a group, each generation prioritizes their values differently.

A note from Rosealee: We are part of a global economy, and none of us is exempt from the web of international business. This is the third in a series of five articles that originate from a keynote address on hope, opportunity, challenge, and change I was recently honored to present at an international business conference in Sao Paulo, Brazil.