Be a Rising Service Star

The 2nd Annual State of Service has been released from SalesForce.comholding_golden_star_pc_1239.  Included are great tips, terrific stats, and a cool self-assessment.  Take the quiz and comment here what your score was.

After I took the assessment I received three best practices that I can really get behind:

  1. Use communities to engage customers and socialize service solutions.
  2. Empower agents to personalize service interactions with a 360-degree customer view.
  3. Use case routing to connect customers with subject matter experts that can close cases fast.

Meet me on LinkedIn to chat about the rising service stars in your brand.

Change in Today’s NEW Marketplace: Evolution or Revolution?

Ask Ray Kroc, founder of the fast food chain, McDonalds, about success.

If you love what you’re doing and you always put the customer first . . . success will be yours.

Ray Kroc

At last count, McDonalds had almost 37,000 locations worldwide so there must be something to this “customer first” thing. Since Kroc’s organization began in 1955, the marketplace has changed. During those six + decades, business has evolved. While many changes influenced the evolution, many have joined Kroc on the list of change leaders. Technology and globalization are among the many factors that fed the evolution. And, each of the leaders that led that evolution share this legacy. They were . . .

Aware of opportunities

Applied sound business practice

Faced challenges

Effected change

Some believe these leaders were just lucky; they were in the right place at the right time.  In truth, historical research indicates these individuals were aware of changes impacting business and dreamed evolution was possible. They dreamed it, hoped it, planned it, and gave it a deadline. Each, in their way, effected evolution.  At the time, some onlookers thought of the changes as revolution. I’m sure for many, the loss of “the way we used to be”, felt like revolution then and to some, what we’re discussing here may also be akin to revolution.

The fluidity of today’s marketplace combined with demographic evolution of the world’s citizenry, have brought us to an intersection of hope, opportunity, challenge, and change. hope opportunity challenge change custom_four_street_sign_13089

No culture, country or business is exempt from addressing a fundamental shift in business promulgated by the fact that people have and are changing.  It is one thing to refer to the generations and quite another to consider that each generation shares a span of birth years and collective experiences. As a group, each generation prioritizes their values differently.

A note from Rosealee: We are part of a global economy, and none of us is exempt from the web of international business. This is the third in a series of five articles that originate from a keynote address on hope, opportunity, challenge, and change I was recently honored to present at an international business conference in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

 

George Washington and the Jesuits Figured It Out — It’s Our Turn!

Civility is always a topic of research on my desk. It is an integral component of everything I do; educational curriculum, business consulting . . . heck . . . life, is all about civility. At its core, civility is respect; respect for self and others.

“Do unto others” has been around for a while. In addition to the obvious early religious references, French Jesuits compiled rules of civility in 1595. Francis Hawkins was the first to publish the Jesuit rules in English in 1640. His work can be traced to Youths Behavior or Decency in Conversation Amongst Men.

George Washington (1732-1799) studied the work as a young man and from washingtonit, fashioned his “110 rules.” He believed the rules were necessary for someone aspiring to be a gentleman.  The rules are mirrored in every publication that focuses on customer service, good business, civility, and success strategies. Yet I find it stunning that they are not mirrored in much of our daily lives.

 

It really is our turn!  If we respected ourselves and others, there would be no need for many of the college courses we teach, a lot of the consulting requests I receive, or articles like this.  Come to think of it, I think world peace would be achieved. But apparently, there is a need for us to be reminded of civility.  Here’s the rule:

Civility Matters!

Relationships happen with civility.  Relationships enhance our lives. Civility increases happiness and wealth.  Rules are still being written and ALL of them route back to the French Jesuits and George Washington.  I applaud Kathleen Elkins’ article in the Business Insider published earlier this year.  The article, “5 simple etiquette habits that help the rich get ahead, according to a man who spent 5 years studying millionaires,” cites these rules:

  1. Send thank you cards
  2. Remember the little details
  3. Have good table manners
  4. Know how to dress
  5. Introduce yourself properly

Not much more needs to be said, but for a step back in time (or perhaps into our future?), read more of George Washington’s, 110 Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation, here.