Negotiating gets intimate cross-culturally

It’s true.  Negotiating cross-culturally is (or should be) an intimate communication.  We don’t need to leave our own country to encounter a multiplicity of cultures we do business with.

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Active listening skills are integral to success. Students in my  SMGT 1215 International Negotiation Strategies online course that begins March 20, will want to read this great article that offers five tips you want to know.  If you are registered for SMGT 1215, spend a few minutes during the next few weeks gathering resources that will help describe active listening.  There may be extra credit in it for you.

Face-to-Face Meetings ARE Global Business

The Meetings Mean Business Coalition, started i
n the U.S. to spread awareness of the economic value of meetings. Since it’s inception the initiative has provided powerful communication and advocacy to the industry. Read more about the globalization of their efforts.

Congratulations to Meetings Mean Business Coalition.  You add value to our career and the future of the industry.

 

 

 

George Washington and the Jesuits Figured It Out — It’s Our Turn!

Civility is always a topic of research on my desk. It is an integral component of everything I do; educational curriculum, business consulting . . . heck . . . life, is all about civility. At its core, civility is respect; respect for self and others.

“Do unto others” has been around for a while. In addition to the obvious early religious references, French Jesuits compiled rules of civility in 1595. Francis Hawkins was the first to publish the Jesuit rules in English in 1640. His work can be traced to Youths Behavior or Decency in Conversation Amongst Men.

George Washington (1732-1799) studied the work as a young man and from washingtonit, fashioned his “110 rules.” He believed the rules were necessary for someone aspiring to be a gentleman.  The rules are mirrored in every publication that focuses on customer service, good business, civility, and success strategies. Yet I find it stunning that they are not mirrored in much of our daily lives.

 

It really is our turn!  If we respected ourselves and others, there would be no need for many of the college courses we teach, a lot of the consulting requests I receive, or articles like this.  Come to think of it, I think world peace would be achieved. But apparently, there is a need for us to be reminded of civility.  Here’s the rule:

Civility Matters!

Relationships happen with civility.  Relationships enhance our lives. Civility increases happiness and wealth.  Rules are still being written and ALL of them route back to the French Jesuits and George Washington.  I applaud Kathleen Elkins’ article in the Business Insider published earlier this year.  The article, “5 simple etiquette habits that help the rich get ahead, according to a man who spent 5 years studying millionaires,” cites these rules:

  1. Send thank you cards
  2. Remember the little details
  3. Have good table manners
  4. Know how to dress
  5. Introduce yourself properly

Not much more needs to be said, but for a step back in time (or perhaps into our future?), read more of George Washington’s, 110 Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation, here.

Change in Today’s NEW Marketplace: Turn Hope into Action

dream

We all need hope.

Hope is the food that feeds our spirit and our soul.  Without the sustenance of hope, we cannot even dream. We, our families, our communities, our world are in a state of flux . . . a transition period fraught with challenges AND opportunity.  That’s what change is all about.

Focus on hope for a moment.  Consider what you are hoping for in your business or career.  What are your personal hopes? Do you wonder what your life would look like if you got what you hope for?  Close your eyes and picture it for just a moment.  Dream it with me.  Now, let’s make it happen.  Let’s take that vision from hope to action.

There are only six steps to turn hope into action. The steps are easy to forget, and many of us stumble when it comes to some of the steps.  I stumble over #3 quite a bit. I’ll admit that I’ve gotten to the point of liking my “child”, but sometimes it’s difficult to let her out.  As you read this list, identify the items you believe you’ll stumble over and make plans to embrace them as part of your journey in turning hope into action.

  1. Strategic intelligence and intuition

The art of being strategic is to consider what could be.  It is to ask questions until there are no more questions to ask.  Yes, it is strategic intelligence AND strategic intuition.  Trust your gut.  Trust your inner voice.

  1. WHO are your stakeholders?

Make a list.  The chances are that list will include your family or community members, co-workers, employees, employers, and customers? Consider not simply what they do and their profession or how they act, but what their generation is as well.  That includes what they care about – their values, their dreams, and their hopes.

  1. Permission to play

Give everyone – yourself included, permission to play.  There is a child inside each of us.  Let them out, please.

  1. Imagination

What if we didn’t have rules? What if we could invent our future and our opportunities?

  1. Innovation and flexibility

I remind you of the child.  As a child, we probably all were asked to draw something and color it.  For most of us, one of those experiences was to draw a house.  So, we drew a house, we added some grass and probably some flowers and then we added the sky.  We probably included the sun.  And if we colored the sun, purple, our teacher would say, oh, no, the sun is never purple.  Well, what if the sun was purple.  From an early age, we are taught to conform . . . to cease imagining what might be and only imagine what society and the rules say should be.  So, if in your heart, your sun is purple, then color it purple!

  1. Connection

It is a worldwide truth that relationships are built on connections.  It is when we get outside of our silo or our sandbox and connect with others that we find like-minded people with other, perhaps weird ideas.  Who knows, you may even find someone who believes the sun should be purple. People find partners when connections happen.  Together they create hope.  Sometimes it’s as simple as sharing a cup of coffee or a drink.  Sometimes it occurs in a public restroom.  (Not kidding; I recently got a new consulting client at a baseball game in a ladies room waiting line.) You never know where an opportunity for growth and change will occur.

fishing

And above all, give everyone time to connect with the change, and with each other.

 

 

A note from Rosealee: We are part of a global economy, and none of us is exempt from the web of international business. This is the second in a series of articles that originate from a keynote address on hope, opportunity, challenge, and change I was recently honored to present at an international business conference in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

A Case for Managing Talent: Build Relationship Frameworks

 

Thank you, Ben Casnocha! Thank you, Millennials!

Is it implausible that I am studying the wisdom of an individual who was born in 1988? Given the similarities between my generation and the Millennial generation, it works. You see, Millennials want to change the world too.  As a Baby Boomer and somewhat of an “earth momma” I knew I was changing the world but then, out of necessity to survive, I conformed.  Like many of my Boomer peers, as I grew older, I recognized that success and happiness were synonymous for me. I came to understand that my success would be achieved if I returned to the authenticity I fought for in the earlier decades of life. One of the things I admire most about Millennials is they share the belief . . . no . . .  the requirement of authenticity.

Millennials waver far less in their values than many in my generation.  They are steadfast in their need to give back to the community, the family, and more.  They are not settling.

I’m referring to Ben Casnocha. To my point, take a moment to review Casnocha’s blog, casnocha.com, or the book he co-authored with Chris Yeh, and Reid Hoffman, The Alliance: Managing Talent in the Networked Age.

The lack of an authentic relationship between employer and employee undermines the loyalty employers desire. Millennials are not just loyal because they should be. Their commitment is  linked to their need to be a part of something that matters and mirror both values and purpose. They want to know that their professional development is taken seriously, including addressing their need to be mentored and coached.  It is not uncommon that a Millennial will similarly require they be allowed to mentor and coach others. For them, 360-degree sustainability is a mandate. That includes their career, family, community . . . and so much more.  Give them all of that, and the Millennial, who many employers believe, will never be loyal, will be by your side for a long time.

The loyalty of a Millennial must be earned. In a recent presentation at Professional Convention Management educational event, Casnocha shared,

We need to use a relationship framework where both sides can make promises to each otehr that they can actually keep.

Ben Casnocha

Professional Convention Management Association, June 2016

 

 

 

 

Change in Today’s NEW Marketplace: A Dream is Just a Dream . . . Until it Has a Deadline

Changes are rarely comfortable. Even if we know the change will increase our success, most of us get a little twitchy when placed outside of our comfort zone.  Real change requires applying action to our wishes and creating measurable goals.

A dream is just a dream. A goal is a dream with a plan and a deadline.

                                                                                                       Harvey MacKay

 

dream

Hope is a key component of dreaming with a deadline.

We all need hope.  It is the food that feeds our spirit and our soul.  Without the sustenance of hope, we cannot even dream. We, our families, our communities, our world are in a state of flux . . . a transition period fraught with challenges AND opportunity.  That’s what change is all about.

Achieving successful change requires authenticity.  If you are not true to yourself, then you cannot possibly be true to anyone or anything else.  Faking it doesn’t work.  When you fake being good at or feeling something, your lack of authenticity is evident.  And, your heart is not in it. Oh sure, you can take classes on doing that “something” well, but if it’s not naturally you, you will only get a little less bad at it, whatever it is. You can fake mediocrity but never success.

That’s why partnerships and collaboration are integral to most success stories. Putting others on your team to do the “something” you are not great at, is a big part of dreaming with a deadline. And always include HOPE!

A note from Rosealee: We are part of a global economy, and none of us is exempt from the web of international business. This is the first in a series of five articles that originate from a keynote address on hope, opportunity, challenge, and change I was recently honored to present at an international business conference in Sao Paulo, Brazil.