All of life is a learning experience

This is the second of Mitchell Myers leadership reflections. It was an honor to share Mitchell’s educational journey at DCTC, and thrilling to watch as he builds a successful leadership career. The following quotation from Mitchell says a great deal about his philosophy of life as well as leadership.

 “All of life is a learning experience. Our lives are full of benchmarks that allow us to rise to the occasion of allowing our peers to rise, and create experiences which allow not only ourselves to thrive, but those we inspire.” 

 

Myers

Mitchell Myers, guest author

I have emphasized the study of management versus leadership throughout my college career. Some individuals find the two terms redundant, but I find leadership to be a very important aspect of business in a new American (and World) century. During the political season, we all hear about “income inequality.” This attaches to leadership in business. It breaks my heart when I hear people complain about income inequality and see them go after people who create jobs and innovations. In the 21st century, businesses have the opportunity to come up with new technology beyond our wildest dreams. They can lead us to a lower cost of living and lower the costs of doing business. I feel that instead of, I suppose I could say, “flower children” complaining about not getting a slice of the pie, our job as leaders in business is to help make the pie bigger, and not take from those who earned it. This requires the leadership of our elected officials to apply term limits to allow for new, local faces to emerge. Once that is complete, I believe we will see a shift in policy that is more local business-centered. To make the pie bigger, businesses and organizations of all kinds must not be resistant to change.

How do we cope with change? As the business world becomes more competitive, ideas of the past do not lead to success. Change is required for survival; hence the need for leadership. There are three ways in which leadership copes with change, according to Kotter:

  • Determine what needs to be done—set direction
  • Arrange people to accomplish the plan
  • Motivate and inspire people to do their jobs

Granted, there will be some people who just won’t budge when it comes to change. They may need to be “voted off the island” for the success of the whole, but most can be convinced through steady leadership, and standing by one’s convictions. A leader must mobilize individual commitment for change. This can be done by setting a specific, realistic vision and direction, demonstrating personal character, and engendering organizational capability. Leaders must remember to be “a part,” not “apart” from the group.

Before an individual can become a good leader, they need to become a good manager. In the 21st century, the focus has shifted from management training roles to leadership training roles. This can be lost in a single generation if it is not kept in focus. Ensuring success, in an organization’s future a leader must do the following:

  • Have realistic expectations
  • View challenges with a depth of perspective
  • Manage upward, sideways and downward
  • Network outside your department/organization or business
  • Determine the kind of Leader you want to be
  • Appeal to the needs and interests of the people you manage or lead
  • Always be an effective self-manager

If one is to know others, their learning styles, their wants and needs, one must also be able to make an analysis of his or herself. Know your limitations, and use it as an opportunity for self-improvement. Leadership is more than writing or making great speeches; it is about inspiring the hearts and mind of people in your organization, or everywhere for that matter, to do their part to move us toward new technology, communication, and wealth. We have finally come to many realizations. We have determined what leadership is, and what it takes to lead us toward new 21st-century leadership. Now the time has come for us to fight the good fight, and get a sense of the future.

As William Zinsser, a writer from the American Scholar would put it, “Joyful Noise.” Robert Henri, a painter from the 19th century, said, “Paint as a man coming over the hill singing.” That is what leaders of the 21st century must do to inspire people who may not be able to go along with their ideas. So I declare:

Leaders, lead as a person ‘coming over the hill singing. Be joyful, and articulate. Share your knowledge and love of intellectual discussion with your peers and team.

If young leaders like myself lead like as a person “coming over the hill singing,” we can inspire, create a picture in the minds of our followers, and climb the mountaintop of destiny. We all are born with talents and dreams, albeit in different conditions and upbringings. It is up to people like us, to move our cause forward. We must fight the good fight, to move humanity in a better direction. As President Ronald Reagan said in his 1981 inaugural address: “We are too great a nation to limit ourselves to small dreams.” Also, “I will fight cheerfully, I will endure, and do my utmost as if the issue of the whole struggle, depended on me alone.” That is what I will become after my graduation: a fighter for true 21st-century leadership, “coming over the hill singing” and inspiring any team or organization I am a part of. Young leaders like myself will need to come together to resolve the problems that now confront us.

Years may pass, and days may go by, but steady leadership in times of change must be solid and have a strong resolve. The rights of humankind still ring clear. We must be led by leaders that believe in liberty and self-actualization. We have a great opportunity to move our businesses and community organizations forward to a new horizon- a horizon that brings us ethical leaders, a constant searching for knowledge, with the growth of businesses and innovation never seen before in the history of the mankind. We can do this, one leader at a time.

Managing Teams. Cambridge, MA: Center for Quality Management, 1995. Print.

“Honor President Reagan’s Legacy.” Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Library. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Apr. 2015.

Kreitner, Robert. Foundations of Management: Basics and Best Practices. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2005. Print.

 

 

 

The Wisdom of Leadership: Shaping Events

I’ve been blessed to work alongside many leaders. Mitchell Myers is one of those individuals. In his semester at DCTC, Mitchell wrote two great reflections on leadership. I am honored to share the first of these here.

                 Mitchell Myers, guest author               Myers

Change is a key challenge for the 21st-century business leader. The adaptive skills necessary to achieve success in a shifting culture and marketplace rely on an increasingly comprehensive knowledge base. Leadership, risk management, inventory management, and the development and training of employees –all of these are things that can make or break a business, as well as a guest’s experience. Whether it be in a hotel, a grocery store, your local bakery, or even your local pizza shop, these controllables are universal in nature. What does it take to be successful as a 21st-century business person? Knowing your market is one of the many keys to success, but does it end there? If one knows the market, price points, as well as the culture, the journey has only just begun. There must be new, bold ideas for the future workforce. While numbers, calculations, and measurements of success are written in stone; the changing dynamics of culture, population, sociopolitical aspects, “acts of God,” and “acts of nature” have an overwhelming force on success.

As leaders, learners, and experiencers, how do we face these change factors in business and in our personal lives? This is not a black or white issue. As we fight for success and influence our way to prosperity, we must not only be accepting of change, but also agents of it.

Agents of change and business success are all around us. One simply needs to strike up a conversation to learn more. In this article, there will be stories across different industries. We will take a look a suburban hotel that I returned to visit after their remodeling, and in follow-up, to an interview I performed there during my first year of college. Then we will visit with local grocery store managers about satisfied customers and employee development. We will glimpse wisdom gleaned in my interview with the CEO of a theater corporation. Lastly, we will explore how to apply these lessons learned in everyday situations to achieve leadership success.

The first step in leadership is to not only know yourself and the people you will be leading. After we figure out how to apply these lessons learned, we will consider how to measure results, and success, as well as define it. In the end, we will bring all of these pieces together to form a vision and roadmap to success for any organization.

Our first story comes from a suburban hotel I originally visited when they were in the process of getting new carpet, renovating rooms, and hiring new staff. I recently had the opportunity to meet with the day manager.The first thing I asked her was, “What made you realize that you wanted to work in the hotel business?” She said that she started working at a local grocery store chain. Through customer interactions and doing sales projects, she decided that her calling was working at a hotel. I asked her if she likes her job as well as and what makes her feel secure about working in the industry? She stated there are certain standards just as any restaurant or business would have, but most of all there is a push for consistent service. When you go to any of this hotel chain’s locations, guests expect the same service and consistency of their room product. The hotel chain is known for uniformity of their brand standard.

She was very busy answering phones, and greeting guests when I was there. At the next opportunity, I was able to ask a few more questions so I inquired about her next career move and asked if she would like to advance to another position in the hotel or continue her work at the front desk. She replied that she wants to be a general manager one day, or run a small hotel of her own in the southwest. Now that she had stated her goal, I wanted to know how she measures her success. She said that as long as she keeps her job, and is at the same level, or running her property- she is successful. She said she would achieve success if she were, “able to save more money than I spend, if I can feed my kids and send them off to college, and retire happily.” About job satisfaction, she said it is what you make of it. “It is all about if the customers are happy, and the company is making money. You have to be clear about standards to the customers and the employees. If any issues arise, such as somebody not enjoying their stay, you have to get to what they really want specifically.”

“What alternatives can you suggest to the guest to make them happy?” I asked. She replied, “An advantage, for example, to giving a dissatisfied customer a free stay, would be that of not losing a customer. The disadvantage would be not making a profit on the room.” I then asked her about the challenges of her career. She stated that the biggest challenge was the hours of work, and being on call many times during the week. She said while that is a big problem, the money she earns makes up for it. It’s always a challenge being away from family, she said. “The biggest problem with being a single mother and working at a hotel is that the time I spend working overtime is time away from my family.” She also stated, “The money is good, so it overshadows the fact that you’re away from your family a big chunk of the time.” I ended our conversation with a question about industry trends. She thinks the huge jump in technology over the last ten years or so for lower-end hotels like hers will start to snowball. She said she had seen other hotels with touchscreen pads, and self-check-in systems, as well as the “ICloud”, and very advanced property management systems. She believes technology will be a huge factor in guest experience during the coming years.

What I learned during my visit at the hotel is that this is a constant, living, and breathing company. The management is very business-oriented, and to my surprise, very educated on aspects of clarity, precision, and consistency. For these reasons, lessons learned from this hotel chain model will be important to my success in the future. The service this location provides and the integrity of the management made my day. And, I wasn’t even a customer! I learned that just being honest and specific in regards to the outcome of the stay, and how the guests can expect consistency no matter what day, year, or location, makes the community a better place to live. Other important “take-aways” from this visit include:

Treat customers with honesty and respect.
Be upfront and specific.
Do everything possible to ensure the customer will return one day.

Now let us take a look at the local grocery store. This particular store is part of a large grocery chain. In a previous job, I worked at a competitive grocery chain. I started as a grocery bagger and then worked my way up to being scheduled in every department, as well as in sales. When that store closed, many staff members were hired by the grocery store discussed here. It was nice to talk to my previous managers and leaders about growth, customer loyalty, as well as training and developing employees. I asked my previous deli manager what it takes to satisfy customers in this industry. He stated, “To satisfy customers you must attract them first.” He continued, “It starts with pricing and product promotion. Once you have a new product, you must find the price point. What are people willing to pay based on their perception of its value? It is about creating a high demand for a product at a higher price of the actual value.” This made me connect the dots from when I was working in his deli as a teenager. In that position I was slicing the meat, putting it in the trays, keeping it fluffed, and adding a piece of wet lettuce to the front of it by the price tag to create a feeling of value and freshness.

Next, I asked both the deli manager and the store director their thoughts on training and developing employees. For them, it all starts with knowing how to make sandwiches, measuring prep amounts, and learning how to price by weight. They stated that food safety is “number one,” and pointed out that sick customers do not come back. I had to get both managers back on track to discuss new training programs, and I was surprised when they indicated there wasn’t one. There are no manuals, training videos, or laminates that allow for training. The corporation relies on the management team of each store to guide employees through expectations by talking and showing. This raised a big red flag for me. Why do they not have a variety of training tools based on the learning styles of trainees? This method lacks consistency. Every manager at each store will have their way of doing things, and they may very well have blinders on.

I believe that new methods of training are needed for the future workforce. Corporations must have a diverse strategy in place to allow all learners to succeed. While I am a newly “minted” management college graduate, it is my opinion that these managers have been clowning around too long with training. Years ago when I was a teenage trainee supervised by these managers, they relied on visual learning; i.e. fluffing the meat to see if it looks right. They continue to use the same ideas they used at the failed store they were at before.

These grocery managers may be able to take advantage of a new training program if they wish to create one. I shared a training outline I created and use at Papa John’s Pizza:

What do customers value?
a.) What we offer is more than pizza, it is an experience.
b.) Customer perceptions ( group discussion on perceptions and reality)
c.) Discussion: Ways we used previously to resolve customer complaints ( transition to LAST)
1.) LAST
a.) Group think: What does it mean to listen, apologize, solve and thank? (Show customer email from corporate showing how it really does work)
b.) Explanation of LAST when dealing with angry or upset customers. (role play in groups of 2)
2.) The new and improved TOOL KIT
a.) Vote on what is most needed during shifts based on experiences (coupons, online promo codes, word lists to use when on the phone)
b.) Show results, and hand team members items voted on to put in the toolkit.) Have team members choose an accessible place for it to be at all times, with a document sheet on which team members write down what they took from the kit with date and initials
c.) Have team members choose an accessible place for it to be at all times, with a document sheet on which team members write down what they took from the kit with date and initials
3.) Retaining business- why it is important
a.) 9 out of 10 people do not let us know when they are upset or unsatisfied ( show figures)
b.) If one person is upset, they will tell others ( show the pyramid diagram)
c.) Discuss why it is important to have a secure customer base ( a.k.a. “Regulars”)
d.) Questions? Concerns? How can I help you all to make this a more fun and enjoyable place of work?

We discussed that this type of training outline would give the grocery store managers an opportunity to inspire, train, and develop their team based on individual learning styles. This meeting was a learning experience for me. The managers received my ideas well and may consider a program like this in the future. Overall, I accept that people can be resistant to change.

To move toward real 21st-century leadership, we must have a strategy and vision. A look back at my interview with the theater corporation CEO gives us this needed guidance. In a previous paper, I wrote about his advice regarding training staff, growing management skills and developing leadership when the time is right. His ideas are sound, and his business is successful, so I was honored when he called me to assist me with this paper. He had a few more ideas for me to share here. They involve how to become a leader within an organization, as well as staff. He made the point that “The biggest thing that impacts leadership of teams for me was never to ask anybody to do anything that you are not willing to do yourself.” He went on to explain that leaders of today must be different from those of yesterday. They must throw away the “eyes wide shut” philosophy of problem-solving, and see a problem before it arises. He always uses the following when looking at a problem:

Assess the situation to determine if there really is a crisis or problem
Identify the steps to make it right
Respond with conviction, and attract positive results

He uses this method when solving crises at his theaters. While this “AIR” method is simple, it really can be used universally to keep any team or leader grounded when issues arise. He also reiterated a point he made in the last talk I had with him, which involves being a leader during trainee development. “The biggest thing is to give people good direction and then leave them alone; do not micro-manage. Never second guess your team; they will notice if you do. Always correct mistakes after, not during the training.” Leadership requires time, flexibility, commitment to the cause, and knowledge. I prompted him about what the most difficult part of training a management team was. He stated, “The biggest hill to climb with managers in training is the aspect of controlling costs and inventory management. Most of us are not number-oriented. It is a learned skill. Most people tend to be idea- and big picture-oriented. Numbers help you measure success and plan financial security within a business. The good thing about most business owners I know is that they have the ability to purchase numerous information systems that allow for numeric analysis.” I find this to be very true, because, at Papa John’s Pizza, our labor %, sales, and projected sales are computed by a focus system. The numbers are continuously being calculated. You just have to know what they mean in the big picture.

Many people, like myself, see math and anything related to it as a burden. Through my college experience, I have been able to relate to numbers and how they are applied in the business world. Fear of mathematics was only a phobia and a lack of understanding. The more I learned, the more numbers made sense. Being able to use numbers to calculate items such as ADR, RevPAR, labor costs, and revenue per square foot allows the bigger ideas to settle in my mind. With numbers, I have to be able to relate them to something in the business world so I can understand them. To me, the idea of mathematics seemed too abstract and distant. Now that I am over that fear I have confidence and security with numeric measures. In fact, I rely on them.

After learning about the struggles of everyday business people such as a hotel day manager, grocery store director, deli manager, and even a President and CEO, I find it is time to come up with an idea for a business. I believe this research exercise helped me move toward that goal with knowledge and creativity.

To be a leader; one must know every aspect of his or her industry. Right now, I am working at Papa John’s, and learning more every day about making big purchasing decisions. The business idea is “Mitch’s Pizza and Wings.” In planning the business, I wrote a purchasing manual that I believe could get a purchasing manager started and is an example of what I might choose to use at a restaurant. Aside from hiring a cohesive team, purchasing decisions are the biggest decisions a new businessperson can make. From choosing suppliers to product specifications, and even storage, creative leadership must be shown during purchasing to ensure a unique and thriving business. All suppliers are real, and prices and weights are accurate in Mitch’s Pizza and Wings purchasing manual.

Leadership is many things, including leading, training and developing employees, purchasing, and more. How is success measured? What is success? Is success measured by personal wealth or the wealth of people within an organization? In my opinion, success is measured by completion of the specified strategy. Did each member of the team do their best to fulfill their designated part, and express their talents? What if each member of the team did their best, followed assigned tasks by the leader, and yet still failed? I have learned that this is a successful failure. A successful failure is when a team did their best to complete that project or objective, did all the right things, and yet the result wasn’t what was intended. They learned from that failure and will apply those lessons in the future. Education is a lifelong journey, so a team that failed can pick up the pieces, learn from their mistakes, and gives it another shot, is ultimately a success.

Success is also measured by not only meeting marks with numbers but by emotions. Do the team members find satisfaction in the results, and do they find satisfaction in the leader? Success is defined many ways by many cultures and societies, but there is one universal norm: Community. Does the success of a business or project ripple out and make an impact on the lives of the community? Your family? Your neighbors? This term may be too broad for some, but it is universally the norm.

Community is the center of our lives and our businesses. Everything we do as individuals affects every person around us, either directly or indirectly. Decisions made at the corporate level trickle down and affect the lives of each worker. The same goes for smaller groups, such as a 12 person corporate team or even teams at the small business down the street. I have learned that if I am to be an executive leading an organization one day, I must be just as involved as the front desk representative, or the brand manager. All levels of a company that I would run would see me every day, working the floor. Managers “lead” from behind a desk, leaders make a call to action, walk the floor to observe operations, and pitch in to show solidarity. We are all connected in big and small ways. A 21st-century leader must know this, and be there for her or his team 24/7 if prosperity and vitality are to be achieved. A teacher told me one time, “Those who run the world, always show up.” This is so true. A leader must take a stand, not sit behind a desk and hope success falls into place.

Citations
http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/, USDA standards for Poultry, and Fresh Vegetables.
http://www.rochestercheese.com/ , Rochester Cheese Company, amounts and measures
Patt Patterson, “Single Source of Supply: Does it really work?” Nation’s restaurant news, July 19th 1993 p. 109
Aaron Prather, “Inventory Management— The principles of effective implementation”, retrieved 12/14/2013 from ezinarticles.com
http://www.retrieversetc.com/Anderson.htm, Anderson Produce Co. Inc, facts and figures on portion size and weight.
http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/freshvegforprocessingstandards, Standard for vegetables
Kreitner, Robert. Foundations of Management: Basics and Best Practices. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2005. Print.

Mentors Open Doors to the Future, For Others and Themselves

Thank you for the positive response about my recent Mentor post, Mentors Make a Difference! Now it’s time to pay it forward. 

I’ve been thinking a lot about mentorship and realizing that we all are mentors.  We may mentor in different ways, but we all model behavior, skills, and values — that’s mentorship!  For many individuals, the act of mentoring goes still further.  And the really great thing is that mentors gain more than they give.  I’ll get to my ideas on that in a moment, but first, let me give you the Hospitality Alumni Mentorship Application.

DCTC alumni are needed to bring education full-circle.  Hospitality and Event Management certificate or degree graduates are doing amazing things in business worldwide.  Pass it on! Graduates, here’s the application you are requesting.

DCTC Hospitality & Event Mentor Program Application

Graduates here is just a partial list of what’s in it for you, besides the obvious “feel good — give back to the community” feeling you get.Develop your own careerhands_circle_team_19002 (1)

  • Get a great addition to your resume
  • Attain increased visibility within the professional community and your workplace
  • Grow your network
  • Add to your collaboration and communication “toolbox”

More mentor initiative information is available hereConnect with me on LinkedIn at any time.

Change in Today’s NEW Marketplace: Evolution or Revolution?

Ask Ray Kroc, founder of the fast food chain, McDonalds, about success.

If you love what you’re doing and you always put the customer first . . . success will be yours.

Ray Kroc

At last count, McDonalds had almost 37,000 locations worldwide so there must be something to this “customer first” thing. Since Kroc’s organization began in 1955, the marketplace has changed. During those six + decades, business has evolved. While many changes influenced the evolution, many have joined Kroc on the list of change leaders. Technology and globalization are among the many factors that fed the evolution. And, each of the leaders that led that evolution share this legacy. They were . . .

Aware of opportunities

Applied sound business practice

Faced challenges

Effected change

Some believe these leaders were just lucky; they were in the right place at the right time.  In truth, historical research indicates these individuals were aware of changes impacting business and dreamed evolution was possible. They dreamed it, hoped it, planned it, and gave it a deadline. Each, in their way, effected evolution.  At the time, some onlookers thought of the changes as revolution. I’m sure for many, the loss of “the way we used to be”, felt like revolution then and to some, what we’re discussing here may also be akin to revolution.

The fluidity of today’s marketplace combined with demographic evolution of the world’s citizenry, have brought us to an intersection of hope, opportunity, challenge, and change. hope opportunity challenge change custom_four_street_sign_13089

No culture, country or business is exempt from addressing a fundamental shift in business promulgated by the fact that people have and are changing.  It is one thing to refer to the generations and quite another to consider that each generation shares a span of birth years and collective experiences. As a group, each generation prioritizes their values differently.

A note from Rosealee: We are part of a global economy, and none of us is exempt from the web of international business. This is the third in a series of five articles that originate from a keynote address on hope, opportunity, challenge, and change I was recently honored to present at an international business conference in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

 

George Washington and the Jesuits Figured It Out — It’s Our Turn!

Civility is always a topic of research on my desk. It is an integral component of everything I do; educational curriculum, business consulting . . . heck . . . life, is all about civility. At its core, civility is respect; respect for self and others.

“Do unto others” has been around for a while. In addition to the obvious early religious references, French Jesuits compiled rules of civility in 1595. Francis Hawkins was the first to publish the Jesuit rules in English in 1640. His work can be traced to Youths Behavior or Decency in Conversation Amongst Men.

George Washington (1732-1799) studied the work as a young man and from washingtonit, fashioned his “110 rules.” He believed the rules were necessary for someone aspiring to be a gentleman.  The rules are mirrored in every publication that focuses on customer service, good business, civility, and success strategies. Yet I find it stunning that they are not mirrored in much of our daily lives.

 

It really is our turn!  If we respected ourselves and others, there would be no need for many of the college courses we teach, a lot of the consulting requests I receive, or articles like this.  Come to think of it, I think world peace would be achieved. But apparently, there is a need for us to be reminded of civility.  Here’s the rule:

Civility Matters!

Relationships happen with civility.  Relationships enhance our lives. Civility increases happiness and wealth.  Rules are still being written and ALL of them route back to the French Jesuits and George Washington.  I applaud Kathleen Elkins’ article in the Business Insider published earlier this year.  The article, “5 simple etiquette habits that help the rich get ahead, according to a man who spent 5 years studying millionaires,” cites these rules:

  1. Send thank you cards
  2. Remember the little details
  3. Have good table manners
  4. Know how to dress
  5. Introduce yourself properly

Not much more needs to be said, but for a step back in time (or perhaps into our future?), read more of George Washington’s, 110 Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation, here.

DCTC Hospitality Reunion and Semester Kick-off School Lunchbox Potluck

Alumni, students, and champions of the DCTC hospitality programs, please join us! Want to know more about being a student? This is a great place to find out!fall semester kick off 2016 invitation

August 15, 5:30-8:30 p.m. at Rosealee’s condo
3600 Wooddale Ave So, St Louis Park MN

RSVP via text to 952-454-1138 w name, /# of people and what you’re bringing. If you’d like to see it in your lunchbox, bring it to share. Rosealee is providing walking pizza, walking taco, and juice box, soda.

 

Visit us on FaceBook and LinkedIn to keep the conversation going!  Get complete DCTC Hospitality Program info here: Meeting and Event ManagementHospitality Lodging ManagementSpa and Resort Management

 

A Case for Managing Talent: Build Relationship Frameworks

 

Thank you, Ben Casnocha! Thank you, Millennials!

Is it implausible that I am studying the wisdom of an individual who was born in 1988? Given the similarities between my generation and the Millennial generation, it works. You see, Millennials want to change the world too.  As a Baby Boomer and somewhat of an “earth momma” I knew I was changing the world but then, out of necessity to survive, I conformed.  Like many of my Boomer peers, as I grew older, I recognized that success and happiness were synonymous for me. I came to understand that my success would be achieved if I returned to the authenticity I fought for in the earlier decades of life. One of the things I admire most about Millennials is they share the belief . . . no . . .  the requirement of authenticity.

Millennials waver far less in their values than many in my generation.  They are steadfast in their need to give back to the community, the family, and more.  They are not settling.

I’m referring to Ben Casnocha. To my point, take a moment to review Casnocha’s blog, casnocha.com, or the book he co-authored with Chris Yeh, and Reid Hoffman, The Alliance: Managing Talent in the Networked Age.

The lack of an authentic relationship between employer and employee undermines the loyalty employers desire. Millennials are not just loyal because they should be. Their commitment is  linked to their need to be a part of something that matters and mirror both values and purpose. They want to know that their professional development is taken seriously, including addressing their need to be mentored and coached.  It is not uncommon that a Millennial will similarly require they be allowed to mentor and coach others. For them, 360-degree sustainability is a mandate. That includes their career, family, community . . . and so much more.  Give them all of that, and the Millennial, who many employers believe, will never be loyal, will be by your side for a long time.

The loyalty of a Millennial must be earned. In a recent presentation at Professional Convention Management educational event, Casnocha shared,

We need to use a relationship framework where both sides can make promises to each otehr that they can actually keep.

Ben Casnocha

Professional Convention Management Association, June 2016